Monthly Archives: February 2014

New photo from Facebook February 21, 2014 at 09:00AM Pin My Kitchen http://ift.tt/1dY7gpk

Not only does going bananas mean “to go crazy,” the term can point to things for which you’ve gone bananas, or obsessions. According to lexicographer E.J. Lighter, going bananas refers to the term going ape often used in American popular culture in the second half of the 1900s. Apes were seen as crazy by the mid-century media, and what do apes eat? Bananas! For example, here at Dictionary.com, we’re bananas for grammar but we go bananas when people end sentences with prepositions. #PinMyKitchen via Facebook Pages http://ift.tt/1eRNzgQ

New photo from Facebook February 20, 2014 at 09:00AM Pin My Kitchen http://ift.tt/1dY7gpk

Apples and oranges refers to two incommensurable items, i.e. a comparison of things that cannot be compared. Though they are both fruits, apples and oranges are separated by color, taste, juiciness and 89.2 million years of evolution. The idiom first appeared as apples and oysters in John Ray’s 1670 Proverb collection, and equivalent terms exist in many languages: “grandmothers and toads” in Serbian to “love and the eye of an axe” in Argentine Spanish. What other funny fruits turn unusual phrases? #PinMyKitchen via Facebook Pages http://ift.tt/1eRNzgQ

New photo from Facebook February 20, 2014 at 09:00AM Pin My Kitchen http://ift.tt/1dY7gpk

Apples and oranges refers to two incommensurable items, i.e. a comparison of things that cannot be compared. Though they are both fruits, apples and oranges are separated by color, taste, juiciness and 89.2 million years of evolution. The idiom first appeared as apples and oysters in John Ray’s 1670 Proverb collection, and equivalent terms exist in many languages: “grandmothers and toads” in Serbian to “love and the eye of an axe” in Argentine Spanish. What other funny fruits turn unusual phrases? #PinMyKitchen via Facebook Pages http://ift.tt/1eRNzgQ

New photo from Facebook February 19, 2014 at 09:00AM Pin My Kitchen http://ift.tt/1dY7gpk

As many of us know from experience, it is not so easy to make a pie. A buttery crust can fall apart in the deftest of hands and around Thanksgiving many pumpkin “pies” might be more accurately deemed pumpkin “soups.” On the other hand (or for our purposes) anyone can become an expert at eating a pie. Popularized in the U.S. in the late 1800s, the most notable use of pie to mean “simple and pleasurable” appears in Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Part of our next food idiom makes a home in many pies, especially in America. #PinMyKitchen via Facebook Pages http://ift.tt/1eRNzgQ

New photo from Facebook February 18, 2014 at 09:00AM Pin My Kitchen http://ift.tt/1dY7gpk

English speakers have been using the word “spill” to mean “divulge secret information” since 1547, but the spilling of beans in particular may predate the term by millennia. Many historians claim that secret societies in ancient Greece voted by dropping black or white beans into a clay urn. To spill those beans would be to reveal the results of a secret vote before the ballots had been counted. Kidney he lives, pinto he dies! #PinMyKitchen via Facebook Pages http://ift.tt/1eRNzgQ